POGIL

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) "...is an active approach to learning designed to guide students to construct their own understanding of key concepts using "explore-invent-apply" learning cycles. Working in small teams, students explore a model, invent or create their own understanding of a key concept, and then apply the concept."

The image to the right shows the learning cycle in POGIL, where students explore a model, develop a conceptual understanding by seeing patterns and relationships in the data, and then students are asked to apply those concepts to a new situation.

From Engage-CSEdu's Engagement Practices on Growing an Inclusive Student Community through Collaborative Learning:

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) "...is an active approach to learning designed to guide students to construct their own understanding of key concepts using "explore-invent-apply" learning cycles. Working in small teams, students explore a model, invent or create their own understanding of a key concept, and then apply the concept."

Transition from "Sage on the Stage" to "Guide on the Side"

Tips for Using POGIL

  • Expect to spend more time on POGIL structure the first few lessons until students know how this collaborative technique works

  • Make sure all students know their role in the group. Just like with pair programming, the instructor should spend time redirecting students to follow the roles.

  • Avoid giving students the answer when they ask. Make sure they are asking neighboring groups first and then ask them questions to guide them to the answer.

  • You don't have to review the answers to all the POGIL worksheet questions as a class. Select the most important concepts or the ones students were struggling with during the activity.

POGIL in Mobile CSP

  • Watch the Mobile CSP 2016-17 Webinar on POGIL (Slides)

  • In Mobile CSP, there are usually worksheets for each POGIL lesson. Some of the questions go in their portfolio so make sure students have access to their answers when writing up their portfolio responses.

Reflection Activity

Consider the following questions:

  • What is inquiry-based learning? How have you used inquiry strategies in other classes?

  • What are the similarities between POGIL and pair programming? How do they address equity issues in the classroom?

  • Explore some of the other Engage CS Edu practices on their website. Are there others you're interested in using in your CS classes?

Resources